This opening also serves as a wonderful example of Andrea Andresakis’s detail-oriented directing. She riddles The Egg Project with so many small actions and hints that both bring out and imbue meaning to Amato’s script.
— by Sarah Weber, Theasy.com
Review of THE EGG PROgECT , directed by Andrea Andresakis at the NYC INTERNATIONAL FRINGE FESTIVAL

Review of THE EGG PROgECT, directed by Andrea Andresakis at the NYC INTERNATIONAL FRINGE FESTIVAL

...the production does dance. In particular, “Generations,” the number that opens the second act, flows in mass movement and bursts with color of costuming and the exuberance of Calypso music.
— Warren Gerds/Critic at Large
Andrea Andresakis, a freelance director, choreographer, performer, and educator, was selected by Eastern Mennonite University in Harrisonburg, VA to direct  Arms and the Man , by George Bernard Shaw. Below is an excerpt from her experience as a Guest Artist:   Article

Andrea Andresakis, a freelance director, choreographer, performer, and educator, was selected by Eastern Mennonite University in Harrisonburg, VA to direct Arms and the Man, by George Bernard Shaw. Below is an excerpt from her experience as a Guest Artist:

Article

What a fantastic production! Everyone raved about the performances, the set, the choreography, the costumes—every detail of the play was masterfully attended to, and that is all due to your clearly exceptional abilities as a director. On behalf of the Play Committee and myself, I thank you for kicking off our 133rd seasons with such aplomb, and I welcome you back after too long of an absence.
— Charlie Sclangen, Play Committee Chair, ACC Theatre, NYC
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OPERA THINK TANK : PUSHING THE BOUNDARIES OF OPERA IN A NEW CENTURY  Article by Andrea Andresakis

OPERA THINK TANK: PUSHING THE BOUNDARIES OF OPERA IN A NEW CENTURY

Article by Andrea Andresakis

“Andrea Andresakis did a fabulous job at utilizing her actor’s talents. The dancing never felt like too much or too staged – it felt like a Broadway show – choreography was there when needed.”
— Kaila M. Stokes, Theatre in the Now